Topeka, Kansas

According to ehuacom, Topeka is the capital of the state of Kansas in the United States. The city has 126,000 inhabitants and a small agglomeration of 233,000 inhabitants (2021).

Introduction

According to mcat-test-centers, Topeka is located in the east of the state on the Kansas River. The city is located 90 kilometers west of Kansas City and 210 kilometers northeast of Wichita. The city has a small center and is located in a flat prairie area. The city has a humid continental climate and a weather pattern of extremes with cold winters with lots of snow and hot summers with a chance of extreme weather.

Topeka is not an economic high-flyer, despite being the capital of Kansas. Growth is about half the US average. The cost of living is very low in Topeka.

Road network

Topeka’s highway network.

Topeka is located on the Kansas Turnpike, which is formed here by Interstate 335 from the south, Interstate 470 along Topeka, and Interstate 70 east of Topeka. I-70 is the main east-west route and accesses the center of the city and comes from Denver. I-470 forms the southern bypass. US 75 forms a north and south approach road and is double-numbered along Topeka with I-470 and I-70.

History

On October 20, 1956, the Kansas Turnpike opened to traffic, which also served the capital, Topeka. The entire route opened from Kansas City to the Oklahoma border, which now includes I-70, I-335 and I-470 around Topeka. The first toll-free highway to open in the region was I-70 west of Topeka in 1960. In 1962, I-70 reached downtown Topeka from the west, and I-70 through Topeka was completed in 1965. Topeka is one of the few American cities where an Interstate Highway has been built right through the center. In 1961, I-470 opened along the southwest side of Topeka, completing the Interstate Highway network around Topeka within 5 years. The US 75 highway route north and south of the city was formed somewhat later. US 75 was grade separated to US 24 as early as the late 1960s, the bridge over the Kansas River is older. This section of US 75 was originally US 75 Bypass, the original US 75 passed through downtown Topeka. The most recent addition to the region’s highway network is the US 75 highway south of Topeka, which opened in 2003, the first new highway in nearly 40 years. Because the city’s population has been stable since the 1960s, there is no need to build new highways.

Congestion

Traffic jams do not occur in Topeka, partly due to the small size of the city. The busiest part has 68,000 vehicles per day. Near the center, only 34,000 vehicles per day travel on I-70. The Kansas Turnpike is much quieter with 7,000 to 13,000 vehicles because it is a toll road.

Wichita, Kansas

Wichita (/ˈwɪtʃɪtɔː/ WITCH-i-taw) is the largest city in the U.S. state of Kansas. The city has 396,000 inhabitants and has a small agglomeration with 648,000 inhabitants (2021).

Introduction

Wichita is located in the south of the state in a flat prairie area. The city is larger than the better known Kansas City and the capital Topeka. The city is located 245 kilometers north of Oklahoma City, 285 kilometers southwest of Kansas City and 700 kilometers southeast of Denver. The agglomeration measures approximately 20 by 20 kilometers and has a fairly low density. Wichita is a major aviation hub and has been referred to as the “Air Capital of the World”. The city has a humid subtropical climate with hot summers and cold, fairly dry winters. Snow occurs in winter. The area often experiences extreme weather such as hail and tornadoes. The city’s growth almost came to a halt in the 1980s but has since picked up again, slightly above the US average since the 1980s.

Road network

Wichita’s highway network.

The Kansas Turnpike, which forms Interstate 35 here, is a toll road along the city. Interstate 135 forms a north-south route to Salina, and Interstate 235 forms the city’s ring road. In addition, US 54 is the busiest highway east-west along the center. State Route 96 is part of the Northern Beltway.

History

The first highway through the Wichita region, the Kansas Turnpike, opened on October 20, 1956, of which I-35 is part. The Kansas Turnpike grazed the Wichita metropolitan area, necessitating more highways connecting this city. The first Interstate Highway built through the region was I-235, Wichita’s western bypass. Most of these opened to traffic in 1962. Construction of I-135 as a north-south axis through Wichita began a little later and was opened between 1971 and 1979, providing Wichita with good north-south connections. However, a good east-west axis was lacking. For this, Kellogg Avenue, US 54, was converted into a freeway. This was the first to happen in western Wichita, in the early 1960s the section between Wichita Airport and the center was made grade-separated. It was not until the early 1990s that a section of US 54 east of downtown was also converted into a freeway, which has been extended to K-96 in more recent years. It was then built on Wichita’s Eastern Beltway, K-96, also known as State Route 96. This section was opened to traffic in about 1993 and is the most recent highway in Wichita. The city of Wichita grew limitedly from the 1960s to the 1990s, but from 1990 the city started to grow faster, which also increased traffic. However, the motorway network has been adequately developed.

Congestion

Wichita is not a city known for traffic jams, quite the contrary. Because the agglomeration is not very large, and the capacity is sufficient for the traffic volumes, there are few traffic jams. The busiest road is US 54 near downtown with 106,000 vehicles per day.

Topeka, Kansas